Beanery Online Literary Magazine

September 11, 2010

9/11

BEANERY ONLINE LITERARY MAGAZINE

Cathi Rhodes posted the following poem in the comments box at the end of FLIGHT 93 CRASH SITE MEMORIAL posted on www.carolyncholland.wordpress.com . I took the liberty of posting it in the Beanery Online Literary Magazine.  Carolyn

You have to understand that at the time, I lived in the peaceful country in Stahlstown, not far from Shanksville. I quite often admired the open sky and used my telescope frequently. On this particular night, I was so moved that I HAD to write, as a catharsis, to help me deal with this tragedy. This is my poem.

9/11

Cathi Rhodes

The sky is quiet…and eerie…and still.

Only the stars give their light

For the innocent and uncounted souls

That ascended to Heaven before night.

A world in shock of a nation’s attack

Finds it so hard to believe

That evil (more…)

September 10, 2010

The Twin Towers

BEANERY ONLINE LITERARY MAGAZINE

THE TWIN TOWERS

M. I. Marcum

     The World Trade Center, from its earliest conception, held a unique place in the heart of New Yorkers. There were many opposed to the project because it would diminish their cherished landmark, the Empire State Building. Others were excited by the challenge of building, not one but two monuments of such unknown scale.

     The Twin Towers, as they became known, slowly rose higher and higher until they overshadowed the skyline of Manhattan. They could be seen for miles. It was difficult to encompass the scale of their massiveness as you stood looking up from ground level.

     Still, many were reluctant to embrace them as part of the New York City, which they knew and loved. Others streamed to take the ride to the very heights. My sister was one of those people. She described to me an adventure, an experience of incomparable wonder. She insisted I visit the restaurant located on the very top floor to enjoy what she had seen. I promised I would one day.

     The years went by. The Towers became not just tourist attractions but an important piece of New York’s business and commerce, employing thousands of people that streamed to its offices from surrounding states and boroughs and Long Island. People you saw on the Long Island Railroad, on the expressway, in the restaurants, at the hot dog stands, shopping at Macy’s.

     Then on that beautiful September day, the Towers (more…)

August 4, 2010

Post World War I Issues

BEANERY ONLINE LITERARY MAGAZINE

POST WORLD WAR I ISSUES

Ashley

     Many issues rose to the surface during the aftermath of World War I. This time span, from 1918 to 1929, was filled with chaos and conflict. Three of the most eminent problems, ranking from the worst to the least problematic, were the issues of labor, the “red scare”, and racial tensions. 

     The most problematic issue after World War I was the unrest of the labor force. Labor problems reflect the unstableness of the economy, which clearly points out the weakness during this era. At the end of World War I, government agencies withdrew their control from the American economy, which released the restricted demands. While people hurried to buy goods which were rationed during the war, businesses increased the prices of their products. The result of this difference was swift inflation, or price increases, on the economy.

     An epidemic of strikes swept across the nation as a result of (more…)

February 2, 2010

River Song: Part 3

BEANERY ONLINE LITERARY MAGAZINE

RIVER SONG Part 3

Tim Landy

     Tim’s story is posted in three parts. To read Part 1, click on: River Song: Part 1 .  For Part 2, click on: River Song: Part 2

     Revisit the Beanery Online Literary Magazine to read the final post of  River Song. Or, for your convenience, subscribe to this site by typing your e-mail address in the SUBSCRIPTION box in the upper right hand column of this site. You will receive a return e-mail asking you to confirm the subscription. Your e-mail will not be publicized.

          The subject of this article is a fascinating woman who lives on the line between nature’s chaotic and man’s organized worlds.

      After graduating from high school, Joan matriculated at Pomona College, a small college in California established to educate westerners in the New England liberal arts tradition.  Here she majored in sociology and art.

            After completing her degree, she and several friends went to Europe.  Eventually she settled in Paris for two years, where she studied etching at a private studio.  Having finished her course of study, she decided to stay on for two more years, working as a secretary in the American Consulate.  When her job was upgraded to that of personnel assistant, she was able to take a position with the State Department in Germany.

            Finally returning to the United States, she soon met her future husband, Charles, a native of Western Pennsylvania.

            “After I married, my focus was on my family,” she says.  I wasn’t ready for a career in art.”

            These days, having reared two sons and two daughters, Joan has more time to (more…)

January 21, 2010

River Song: Part 2

BEANERY ONLINE LITERARY MAGAZINE

RIVER SONG Part 2

Tim Landy

     Tim’s story is posted in three parts. To read Part 1, click on: River Song: Part 1 . Revisit the Beanery Online Literary Magazine to read the final post of River Song.

     Or, for your convenience, subscribe to this site by typing your e-mail address in the SUBSCRIPTION box in the upper right hand column of this site. You will receive a return e-mail asking you to confirm the subscription. Your e-mail will not be publicized.

          The subject of this article is a fascinating woman who lives on the line between nature’s chaotic and man’s organized worlds.

            While most gardeners despise the ubiquitous weeds, Joan welcomes these unwanted guests with open gloves.  Smiling, she says, “Everything was a weed at first.  Wouldn’t it be wonderful to have a garden of weeds!  When I go out in early spring, I see everything bare.  I start to plant seeds and I can feel the weed seeds saying, ‘We were here first!’”  

            Her present reading list includes Weeds of the Northeast.  But unlike the authors, who wrote the text to help readers identify and destroy unwanted plants, Joan uses the book as a field guide, locating one of her favorites, the Pennsylvania smart weed, which, to her delight, has taken over the pumpkin patch across the road from the farmhouse.

            “When you give a weed a name, it acquires (more…)

January 18, 2010

River Song: Part 1

BEANERY ONLINE LITERARY MAGAZINE

RIVER SONG Part 1

Tim Landy

     Tim’s story is posted in three parts. Revisit the Beanery Online Literary Magazine to read the coming two posts that complete River Song.

     Or, for your convenience, subscribe to this site by typing your e-mail address in the SUBSCRIPTION box in the upper right hand column of this site. You will receive a return e-mail asking you to confirm the subscription. Your e-mail will not be publicized.

     The subject of this article is a fascinating woman who lives on the line between nature’s chaotic and man’s organized worlds.

            When friends stop by Joan Patterson’s weathered farmhouse in late summer or early autumn, more than likely she’ll be in her garden, puttering with her perennials or picking vegetables or resting in her favorite spot: a shadowy bower at the end of a winding path.

            For Joan, this dome-shaped shelter, formed from bowed saplings and cloaked in spiraling bean plants and morning glories, is the center of her miniature Eden.  The garden, in turn, is the (more…)

November 2, 2009

Apologize to a Vet

BEANERY ONLINE LITERARY MAGAZINE

APOLOGIZE TO A VET
Joe F. Stierheim

     Last year I attended a meeting on Veterans’ Day. Before the meeting started, one of the attendees came up to me, hand extended in friendship. “Thank you,” she said.
     “For what?” I asked, genuinely confused.
     “You’re a veteran, aren’t you? Veterans are supposed to be thanked on Veterans’ Day.”
     It wasn’t until after the end of the meeting—after I had had a chance to get my thoughts in order—that I talked to my friend a second time.
     “I appreciate you doing what you thought you should,” I said, “but next Veterans’ Day, don’t thank me or any other veteran. Instead, (more…)

May 22, 2009

Executive Order 10730: Desegregation of Central High School (1957)

BEANERY ONLINE LITERARY MAGAZINE

EXECUTIVE ORDER 10730:

DESEGREGATION OF CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL

 (1957)

Ashley

       Since the beginning of time, every social group has had to fight for its freedom.  Regardless of whether the injustices the groups fought against pertained to religion, nationality, gender, or race, they were injustices all the same. African Americans were one of these groups that have had to endure injustices since the beginning of time. Around the 1950’s (more…)

March 11, 2009

The Battle for Peace: A Book Review

BEANERY ONLINE LITERARY MAGAZINE

THE BATTLE FOR PEACE: A Book Review

Joe F. Stierheim    

 

     In the book The Battle for Peace by Zinni & Koltz, it tells about a man who went from a young lieutenant in Vietnam to Commander-in-Chief of US Central Command (CENTCOM). Retired Marine General Tony Zinni has viewed combat from every perspective. He has also had direct involvement in humanitarian efforts in nations suffering from the onset of disease and natural disasters as well as political strife. All of these experiences have led him to advocate (more…)