Beanery Online Literary Magazine

November 12, 2009

Arthur St. Clair

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BEANERY ONLINE LITERARY MAGAZINE

ARTHUR ST. CLAIR

Shirley Iscrupe

      Arthur St. Clair, Ligonier Valley’s most famous citizen of Revolutionary times, was born in Thurso, Caithness, Scotland, in 1734. As a young man he joined the 60th (Royal American) Regiment of Foot to fight in Canada against the French.

     After marriage to a niece of the governor of Massachusetts, he served as an agent of the Penn family interests in western Pennsylvania, and as civil commandant of the decommissioned British fort at Ligonier. At the outbreak of hostilities with the English, St. Clair was commissioned as a (more…)

October 7, 2009

AT FORT LIGONIER: Excerpt from book, WARPATH

BEANERY ONLINE LITERARY MAGAZINE

AT FORT LIGONIER

An excerpt from WARPATH

Charles R. Martin & Sara Mitchell Martin

An excerpt from the book WARPATH, a self-published historical novel set in Southwestern Pennsylvania.

     When the French and Indian war ended in 1763 with the Treaty of Paris, John Martin heard that some of the Ohio Indians were coming to Fort Ligonier to discuss treaties. He was already in Bedford Village and decided to go, without hesitation, to the fort. It was some days hike away, but he arrived in time to see that there were Delaware Indians present. Fort Ligonier was large and strong and well manned. The Indians were camped a half mile away, having teepees and horses.

     After first making himself known to the red-coated soldiers at the Fort, John asked the soldier who seemed most in charge if he knew the Indians.

     “Yes. They have been coming around lately, being fairly friendly. We give them what we can of our stores to try to build some sort of relationship. Do you talk Indian?”

     “Well, I used to be able to make myself understood. That was a while back. They took my family: my wife and five of my children.”

     “I am sorry to hear about that. Did you get any back yet?”

     “Yes, my wife, she is just an incredible person. She made her way back with the youngest, a little girl. They had quite an adventure. The Indians still have (more…)