Beanery Online Literary Magazine

February 2, 2010

River Song: Part 3

BEANERY ONLINE LITERARY MAGAZINE

RIVER SONG Part 3

Tim Landy

     Tim’s story is posted in three parts. To read Part 1, click on: River Song: Part 1 .  For Part 2, click on: River Song: Part 2

     Revisit the Beanery Online Literary Magazine to read the final post of  River Song. Or, for your convenience, subscribe to this site by typing your e-mail address in the SUBSCRIPTION box in the upper right hand column of this site. You will receive a return e-mail asking you to confirm the subscription. Your e-mail will not be publicized.

          The subject of this article is a fascinating woman who lives on the line between nature’s chaotic and man’s organized worlds.

      After graduating from high school, Joan matriculated at Pomona College, a small college in California established to educate westerners in the New England liberal arts tradition.  Here she majored in sociology and art.

            After completing her degree, she and several friends went to Europe.  Eventually she settled in Paris for two years, where she studied etching at a private studio.  Having finished her course of study, she decided to stay on for two more years, working as a secretary in the American Consulate.  When her job was upgraded to that of personnel assistant, she was able to take a position with the State Department in Germany.

            Finally returning to the United States, she soon met her future husband, Charles, a native of Western Pennsylvania.

            “After I married, my focus was on my family,” she says.  I wasn’t ready for a career in art.”

            These days, having reared two sons and two daughters, Joan has more time to (more…)

January 21, 2010

River Song: Part 2

BEANERY ONLINE LITERARY MAGAZINE

RIVER SONG Part 2

Tim Landy

     Tim’s story is posted in three parts. To read Part 1, click on: River Song: Part 1 . Revisit the Beanery Online Literary Magazine to read the final post of River Song.

     Or, for your convenience, subscribe to this site by typing your e-mail address in the SUBSCRIPTION box in the upper right hand column of this site. You will receive a return e-mail asking you to confirm the subscription. Your e-mail will not be publicized.

          The subject of this article is a fascinating woman who lives on the line between nature’s chaotic and man’s organized worlds.

            While most gardeners despise the ubiquitous weeds, Joan welcomes these unwanted guests with open gloves.  Smiling, she says, “Everything was a weed at first.  Wouldn’t it be wonderful to have a garden of weeds!  When I go out in early spring, I see everything bare.  I start to plant seeds and I can feel the weed seeds saying, ‘We were here first!’”  

            Her present reading list includes Weeds of the Northeast.  But unlike the authors, who wrote the text to help readers identify and destroy unwanted plants, Joan uses the book as a field guide, locating one of her favorites, the Pennsylvania smart weed, which, to her delight, has taken over the pumpkin patch across the road from the farmhouse.

            “When you give a weed a name, it acquires (more…)

January 18, 2010

River Song: Part 1

BEANERY ONLINE LITERARY MAGAZINE

RIVER SONG Part 1

Tim Landy

     Tim’s story is posted in three parts. Revisit the Beanery Online Literary Magazine to read the coming two posts that complete River Song.

     Or, for your convenience, subscribe to this site by typing your e-mail address in the SUBSCRIPTION box in the upper right hand column of this site. You will receive a return e-mail asking you to confirm the subscription. Your e-mail will not be publicized.

     The subject of this article is a fascinating woman who lives on the line between nature’s chaotic and man’s organized worlds.

            When friends stop by Joan Patterson’s weathered farmhouse in late summer or early autumn, more than likely she’ll be in her garden, puttering with her perennials or picking vegetables or resting in her favorite spot: a shadowy bower at the end of a winding path.

            For Joan, this dome-shaped shelter, formed from bowed saplings and cloaked in spiraling bean plants and morning glories, is the center of her miniature Eden.  The garden, in turn, is the (more…)

October 15, 2008

A DOVE STORY RETOLD: JASMINE AND JEWEL

BEANERY ONLINE LITERARY MAGAZINE

A DOVE STORY RETOLD: JASMINE AND JEWEL

 KATHLEEN

     Fluttering and cooing the Mourning Doves chased each other back and forth across my balcony porch. They made such a commotion I began watching them in earnest. Mating season was in full swing! After covering the potting soil with loosely laid straws and grass, the female dove perched on the empty window box planter and laid two cream-colored, one-inch eggs. I knew nothing about dove mating habits, but was thrilled I’d been chosen to observe this “up close and personal” process.
     Quickly, I learned the male and female participate equally in the nesting vigil. The female usually sits all night, while the male (more…)

September 30, 2008

FAITH THROWN OVERBOARD

BEANERY ONLINE LITERARY MAGAZINE
FAITH THROWN OVERBOARD
PHILIP LETIZIA

     Many people who hear the word faith feel the bitter cold rush of uneasiness creep up their spine. How can so many people be sure about things? they ask. How can they claim to have a better grasp on all of this than I do?
     Faith is certainty to many. Unwavering. Commitment. Belief in something no one can see, and no one can feel. How can you be sure?
     Those who believe, those who hold tight to faith or a certainty in things not quite understood, still have room for uncertainty, for doubt, and for questions. Yes, the uncertainty is still there. The lie we’ve bought and sold, the lie told to those of us who are less certain, the lie that we can never be allowed to see, is (more…)

September 13, 2008

PLEASE GIVE THAT MAN A QUARTER!

BEANERY ONLINE LITERARY MAGAZINE
PLEASE GIVE THAT MAN A QUARTER!
Peggy Jo
On my morning walk around town this morning I came upon a man with a fishing tag on his cap. Fishing season just started. When I wished him “A happy day of fishing,” instead of his saying “Thank you,” I had to listen to his tirade of having to pay a parking fine.
Now, I have had to pay parking fines in this town, too, so I wasn’t (more…)

April 27, 2008

SHALIMAR

—written by Kathleen

Shalimar, exotic cat
shadow of her past
darkly mysterious
independent
proud
watches me with topaz eyes,
regally surveying (more…)

April 18, 2008

YE OLD ’ROUND ’TUIT

—written by Kathleen

When I was a teenager, the pastor of a local Methodist church I attended was noted for his sense of humor. We never knew what he’d joke about next or what he’d invent. But in our youth group, a standard joke was his “’round ’tuit’s” variations.

Whether he or others were the procrastinator, didn’t matter. When he ordered the first ’round ’tuit trivets and passed them out to everyone we knew his sense of humor had form and substance! I kept mine (more…)