Beanery Online Literary Magazine

December 5, 2010

Times: They are A-Changing

BEANERY ONLINE LITERARY MAGAZINE

TIMES: They are A-Changing

Bob Sanzi

     Were you born before 1960? 

     If so, you would be one of those kids whose parents told their children what to do and when to do it. There was direction in your life then. It was a much easier world to understand. Things just seemed simpler. 

     Isn’t everything more complicated now? Nothing we do is simple anymore. Do you think the world is all out of whack?  How many times in a day do you find yourself thinking “Huh?”

     For example: Did you buy a box of frozen green beans only to find that when you opened it the beans were lumped in a plastic bag with a chunk of something yellow?  When you dug the empty box out of the kitchen trash did you discover specific instructions on what to do with the bagged beans? Did it involve a microwave? 

     See what I mean?

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     When I was in high school I learned how to type. Leaning how to drive a typewriter was supposed to help you when you went to College. So I was instructed to learn to type because I would be going to college.

     When is the last time you saw a typewriter? Here’s an interesting exercise: try to explain a typewriter to (more…)

September 10, 2010

The Twin Towers

BEANERY ONLINE LITERARY MAGAZINE

THE TWIN TOWERS

M. I. Marcum

     The World Trade Center, from its earliest conception, held a unique place in the heart of New Yorkers. There were many opposed to the project because it would diminish their cherished landmark, the Empire State Building. Others were excited by the challenge of building, not one but two monuments of such unknown scale.

     The Twin Towers, as they became known, slowly rose higher and higher until they overshadowed the skyline of Manhattan. They could be seen for miles. It was difficult to encompass the scale of their massiveness as you stood looking up from ground level.

     Still, many were reluctant to embrace them as part of the New York City, which they knew and loved. Others streamed to take the ride to the very heights. My sister was one of those people. She described to me an adventure, an experience of incomparable wonder. She insisted I visit the restaurant located on the very top floor to enjoy what she had seen. I promised I would one day.

     The years went by. The Towers became not just tourist attractions but an important piece of New York’s business and commerce, employing thousands of people that streamed to its offices from surrounding states and boroughs and Long Island. People you saw on the Long Island Railroad, on the expressway, in the restaurants, at the hot dog stands, shopping at Macy’s.

     Then on that beautiful September day, the Towers (more…)

July 14, 2010

The Legacy of Hopedale, Massachusetts

BEANERY ONLINE LITERARY MAGAZINE

THE LEGACY OF HOPEDALE, MASSACHUSETTS

Fran 

    Throughout her life my grandmother often spoke about growing up “near Heaven, this wonderful Hopedale of ours.”

Elizabeth Noyes (rt) with her sister May (c 1898)

     Elizabeth Amanda Noyes was born in Hopedale, Massachusetts, in 1890. Her parents, William and Mary Cotton Noyes, had moved there to raise their children in a place where faith and family came first, where they knew a hard work ethic would prevail, and where they would feel secure. The self-contained town was religiously based. Sundays were always for faith and family. It remained that way during my grandmother’s entire life.
     Lizzie, as she was known, loved to speak of those first days swimming in the pond was allowed for girls. Apparently a somewhat scandalous event, she felt it was a big step forward for women. This always amazed me as she truly was old-fashioned: she cooked, cleaned, knew nothing about driving, or voting, and my grandfather made all decisions.

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     Draper Mill, one of the oldest textile mills in the country, dominated (more…)

May 17, 2010

Idlewild Amusement Park Memories

BEANERY ONLINE LITERARY MAGAZINE

IDLEWILD AMUSEMENT PARK MEMORIES

Patricia Orendorff Smith

     Many of us have visited Idlewild Park in Ligonier Township, Pennsylvania. I asked my friend, Jackie, to recount her memories in the late 1950s to the 1970s.

     “Since I was a baby, my dad attended Rockwell Manufacturing, Inc. picnics at Idlewild,” Jackie said. Her family has slides of their time spent there. “I wonder if I remember the occasion or if my memories come from the pictures.”     

     Jackie’s first memory at four years of age revolved around the roller coaster. She thinks she was too young to ride the tall ride.

     “My sister and I always wanted a gold fish at the Goldfish Pond,” Jackie said. “My sister got one.” Jackie was determined to get a goldfish. She saved money and when she was eight, she won a goldfish. “I had to walk around the park all day (carrying it).” On the ride home, Jackie remembered (more…)

November 12, 2009

Arthur St. Clair

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BEANERY ONLINE LITERARY MAGAZINE

ARTHUR ST. CLAIR

Shirley Iscrupe

      Arthur St. Clair, Ligonier Valley’s most famous citizen of Revolutionary times, was born in Thurso, Caithness, Scotland, in 1734. As a young man he joined the 60th (Royal American) Regiment of Foot to fight in Canada against the French.

     After marriage to a niece of the governor of Massachusetts, he served as an agent of the Penn family interests in western Pennsylvania, and as civil commandant of the decommissioned British fort at Ligonier. At the outbreak of hostilities with the English, St. Clair was commissioned as a (more…)

September 21, 2009

Destination: Ligonier (PA)

BEANERY ONLINE LITERARY MAGAZINE

DESTINATION: LIGONIER (PA)

Sally Shirey

     It is difficult to trace the growth of the hospitality industry in the Ligonier Valley without noting the attendant development of transportation across the region as well.

     The Ligonier Valley was the first stopping place west of the Allegheny Mountains for settlers seeking new lives after the defeat of the French in 1758.  Those earliest pioneers followed the primitive Forbes Road, rough and barely wide enough for their wagons.  Settlements and towns first developed near (more…)

February 9, 2009

MIDDLE AGE KNIGHT vs. MODERN DAY SOLDIER

BEANERY ONLINE LITERARY MAGAZINE

MIDDLE AGE KNIGHT vs. MODERN DAY SOLDIER

Ashley

     Civilization has always had some sort of defense system. In the Middle Ages, civilization had the knights to protect them, while today’s society is protected by soldiers. Over time the role has slightly adapted to accommodate different aspects and needs of society, but (more…)

February 7, 2009

LAUREL HIGHLANDS

BEANERY ONLINE LITERARY MAGAZINE

LAUREL HIGHLANDS

Dale 

    

 
     Some mountain men in the Laurel Highlands continue to distill their own moonshine in copper pipes and pots. During prohibition, they used this product as a way to survive, either by bartering or for cash. Those visitors who had reason to intrude on their property found themselves threatened by (more…)

November 21, 2008

MOTHER TERESA: IN MEMORIAM

BEANERY ONLINE LITERARY MAGAZINE

MOTHER TERESA: IN MEMORIAM

Mustang Sally

On one anniversary of Mother Teresa’s death, Mustang Sally sent the Beanery Writers Group members an excerpt on her from the book  Mustang Sally’s Guide to World Bicycle Touring. It was a telling of Mustang Sally’s meeting with Mother Teresa.
Mother Teresa was born in Skopje Macedonia. She was seven years old when her father was murdered and her family fell into poverty. She decided to follow in the footsteps of the Irish missionary nuns who educated her. She trained in Dublin Ireland at age 18. Her first assignment was in Calcutta, India, where she taught high school and worked her way to principal.
One day she found a woman dying in the street and sat with her, stroking her head until death came. This experience inspired her to found a new religious order. The Order of the Missionaries of Charity devoted itself to anyone who was “unwanted, unloved and uncared for.” By the time she died the Order included more than 5,000 nuns and brothers who operated over 2,500 orphanages, schools, clinics and hospices in 120 countries, including the United States.

     10.18.95  Calcutta. Tomorrow is to be the last day in Calcutta and I will spend it going to the Lepers’ colony.  It is fairly far from the city and is quite extensive when you get there. The ill are given a place to stay and work so that they can be self-supporting.   Linda wants me to go to the Varinasi with her and I would like to do that but I have my schedule.
     The place we visited today was for women from a prison. These women were in terrible condition when Mother Teresa got them out of prison. They had been kept in (more…)